NEWS: Japan notes increase in Skyline, NSX prices due to overseas interest

JDM price increase chart

The above chart was one of the most circulated automotive news items in Japan over the weekend. It depcits how the nation’s wheeled icons have skyrocketed in price since just four months, with a certain model jumping nearly 1 million yen. The cause? Cars joining the 25 Year Club, making them eligible for import in places like the US. 

YI2669_NissanSkylineR32-GTR

The article, published on Yahoo Japan Business, claims that the prices of R32 Skyline GT-Rs have jumped from ¥1.90 million in November of 2015 to to ¥2.07 million today (the equivalent $16,900 to $18,400 USD, an increase of $1,500). That’s a notable jump, but still proof that there are deals to be had compared to the $80,000 low-mileage example that sold at auction in the US earlier this year.

GR1-863s_Honda NSX & S800

The Honda NSX has also seen a healthy rise in value. Since November Japanese prices have grown from ¥4.33 to ¥4.85 million (the equivalent of $38,600 to $43,200 USD, an increase of $4,600)

Usui_Touge02-Nissan_Skyline_GTR_R34_police_car

The R34 Skyline GT-R was the model that had alarm bells going off with the nearly 1 million yen jump. Back in November, it was the average price was ¥5.01 million. Now it’s ¥5.92 million (the equivalent of $44,600 to $52,700 USD, an increase of $8,100). This one is due to Canadians, who are lucky enough to have a 15 year import rule. That also means Canada has 10 years to buy the best cars before we do.

The article also cites the fact that the early 1990s saw a boom in domestic (Japanese in this case) sports cars, timed just as young car enthusiasts who grew up in the golden age could afford top-dollar vehicles. That flooded the market, leaving many prime examples to be picked today. Notably, it also calls the 25 year import rule by the US government “protectionism” of the US auto industry, a common belief in Japan that is not entirely inaccurate.

The article has gone viral across Japan’s car enthusiast community. Some Facebook users have responded with surprise. “It is a true story,” said one who shared the link. Others have made comments such as, “It is sad to see such a considerable number of cars go abroad,” countered by “In the old days, Japanese would chop them up. I’d rather sell my car to the most worthy buyer. A lot of overseas buyers are collectors who will keep the cars in better shape.”

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22 Responses to NEWS: Japan notes increase in Skyline, NSX prices due to overseas interest

  1. Mike said:

    I better get mine before it’s too late. Nice article!

  2. john said:

    older cars such an r30 have doubled in the last 5 years.

  3. john said:

    also worth noting, i bought a MINT low mileage r32 in 2006 for $5k. and it wasn’t an unusual find

  4. Brendan said:

    Watanabe 8 spoke rims or the work equip 01’s.

  5. SHC said:

    State side NSX’s, be they NA1 or NA2 have increased dramatically. Japanese cars as a whole are the “as yet” untapped segment of the collectors market. This is changing rapidly.

    • Ant said:

      They’ve been going up in the UK too. NA2s have always been fairly expensive since Honda sold so few here, but where five years ago you could find decent NA1s for maybe £15k, you’re looking at a minimum of £25k today.

      I’m not sure that’s overseas interest though so much as the car being carried on the wave of rising classic car prices in general.

  6. Aj said:

    We’ve been taking advantage up here. I just imported a type z altezza recently.

  7. What about Supra? They seem to have gone through the roof!

  8. Hashiriya86 said:

    Note to self: Buy R34 before leaving Japan.

  9. Nigel said:

    Already seen an R34, but an R30 is more interesting to me.
    (R34’s were new when the first FnF movie was out so there may be a spike soon).

  10. ahja said:

    I wish the TPP has some provision about getting rid of that 25yr rule.

  11. cesariojpn said:

    Nissan should’ve just released the R’s worldwide.

  12. Beardy said:

    Buy a 33 gtr series 3, better and cheaper than a 34r. I know, you laugh, yet do the research, get off any online bandwagons, turn off fast and furious (you noob), and get educated. Oh, also prices have been rising is areas that contain intelligence, not bogan simpletons.

  13. atx said:

    I cannot wait for mkIV supras to hit 25 years so the guys hoarding them here see just how foolish they have been. They are so cheap everywhere outside the US. The fact that sc300/400’s worth 3k would take 15-20k minimum to find an equally nice MKIV boggles my mind.

    • Stj said:

      Twin turbo Supra’s ain’t cheap in Japan and almost extinct! Good luck finding a good one in two years! Wouldn’t get my hopes of finding anything under 4.000.000 yen by then.

  14. Banpei said:

    So basically if I would have bought a new Skyline GT-R R34 in 2000, drove it “gently” for 80.000km and sold it after sixteen years ownership I would actually make profit? Mad! 😀

  15. Ant said:

    I’m probably overstating America’s interest in the car, but this sort of thing is why I feel I need to get hold of an Autozam AZ-1 before it turns 25. They’re already relatively expensive, but I have visions of the prices being pushed up to ridiculous levels once they become legal elsewhere…

  16. Rhyle said:

    Glad I bough mine right before inflation!! I’ll take a mint vspec 2 bnr34 w/ under 23xxxkms for well under inflation prices!!😎

  17. Chris figueroa said:

    Good thing i got my soarer already in the states. Mz20 with a 7mgte FTW

  18. Serg said:

    Also lookout in the coming years as Australia will be reviewing policies for 2018 and it looks like we’ll have a rolling 25yo unrestricted rule as opposed to the current 1989 cut off, personal import allowance for cars under 1 year old and <500km as well as changes to existing import schemes allowing rare or different variants to be imported, so stuff like the NSX will roll in and things like the JDM WRX and Evo variants could come in as well. As a lot of people point out, at least the rising prices make them less likely to become cheap bangers.

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