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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 3:32 pm 
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Posts: 111
Location: Montreal, Canada
Well, I just heard a rumor that the stock cams will not live long enough under the cam covers to see the startup... ;)

Anyway, took a step back to take two forward...

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I removed all my setup to relocate the mechanical oil pressure gauge fitting and drilled and taped the sandwich plate for it. The stock 1/8BSPT hole will receive the 3K pressure switch so I'll be able to tap into the wire under the dash to feed it to a naturally closed relay to power the electric fuel pump... if oil pressure is loss, the light in the dash turns on and the relay will open cutting power to the fuel pump... nice thing to prevent fuel from spilling in your face when you crash.

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 4:00 am 
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Sunday evening and sitting on my lonesome in a hotel in Sydney. Kinda bored, so started looking through older threads when I came across this little Peanut.

Looks absolutely brilliant!! 8)
Just had to rear through the whole thread - just a shame those first pics are now missing.
But she sure looks good! I'm not normally one for restomods, but I just might make an exception on this one.
Love the colour, the mattblack hood, the stance, the Wats and generally just your way of going about the whole project. Hope there's another update coming soon... :wink:

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Anders.

JDM '77 Toyota Trueno 1600GT Sprinter (TE61)
+ a handful of classic BMW's from the 60's and 70's.


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:43 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 7:39 pm
Posts: 287
Location: NC
Tommy wrote:
I removed all my setup to relocate the mechanical oil pressure gauge fitting and drilled and taped the sandwich plate for it. The stock 1/8BSPT hole will receive the 3K pressure switch so I'll be able to tap into the wire under the dash to feed it to a naturally closed relay to power the electric fuel pump... if oil pressure is loss, the light in the dash turns on and the relay will open cutting power to the fuel pump... nice thing to prevent fuel from spilling in your face when you crash.


Diggin' the build boss :tu:

Couldnt you get a inertia fuel pump cutoff switch? If the fuel pump is cut off when there is no oil pressure then wont it be cut off until you turn the engine over?
Im not trying to bust your balls by any means and I totally get what you are doing. If you put a solid state timer before the relay, this would allow the pump to prime before its power is cut due to lack of oil pressure. Thats just a thought and hope it works out without having to do what I suggested. Keep us updated for sure!

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1970 corona MKII wagon (22RE swap)
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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 11:53 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 6:48 am
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Location: Montreal, Canada
travmac79 wrote:
Tommy wrote:
I removed all my setup to relocate the mechanical oil pressure gauge fitting and drilled and taped the sandwich plate for it. The stock 1/8BSPT hole will receive the 3K pressure switch so I'll be able to tap into the wire under the dash to feed it to a naturally closed relay to power the electric fuel pump... if oil pressure is loss, the light in the dash turns on and the relay will open cutting power to the fuel pump... nice thing to prevent fuel from spilling in your face when you crash.


Diggin' the build boss :tu:

Couldnt you get a inertia fuel pump cutoff switch? If the fuel pump is cut off when there is no oil pressure then wont it be cut off until you turn the engine over?
Im not trying to bust your balls by any means and I totally get what you are doing. If you put a solid state timer before the relay, this would allow the pump to prime before its power is cut due to lack of oil pressure. Thats just a thought and hope it works out without having to do what I suggested. Keep us updated for sure!


Yep I could go that way... I thought about wiring a toggle switch on the dash to prime the system when it's not been run for a while... although I may also prime the oil pump with a drill in those occasion so I could also leave the keys in the "on" position and as soon a oil pressure get high enough, the fuel pump turns on and fills the carb bowls.

02Anders wrote:
Sunday evening and sitting on my lonesome in a hotel in Sydney. Kinda bored, so started looking through older threads when I came across this little Peanut.

Looks absolutely brilliant!! 8)
Just had to rear through the whole thread - just a shame those first pics are now missing.
But she sure looks good! I'm not normally one for restomods, but I just might make an exception on this one.
Love the colour, the mattblack hood, the stance, the Wats and generally just your way of going about the whole project. Hope there's another update coming soon... :wink:


Thanks a lot. :D

Unfortunately, my life has gone a little sideways lately. My life partner for the last 10 years has left me. It's been kind of going bad for the last couple of years but I still had hope... but she doesn't love me anymore and as the saying goes : "It takes two to tango". So we've got to sale the house and manage things with our 6 year old son. So yeah I've got other things to do right now. I'm not saling the car or abandonning, but I've got others priority right now so it may not progress the way I first tought.

But I also realized that I haven't updated here in a long long time and their has been some progress on the thing, I'll try to find a couple minutes later to get my build thread where it should be.

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:26 pm 
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Location: Montreal, Canada
So I fixed the broken picture links on the first pages and manage to copy what was missing from the last couple of months of work from an other forum... might look a little crazy but I hope it'll still be somewhat easy to follow.

First, I had some trouble fitting 14" wheel on the car, from the suspension swap. :S

When turning the wheel, the back side of the inside wheel was hitting the wheel well pretty badly

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And cause me to not be able to turn the steering lock to lock... poor angle...

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So I dialed in as much caster as I could through the tension (radius) rods adjustement to bring the wheel a little forward in the well to stop it from hitting the back.

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Much better, not "driftastict" but I can now go lock to lock which is not a bad thing ;)

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But clearance is marginal... gladly the spring rates on the cut 6kg TRD has gone up which will help to resist motion... and lets hope that the poly bushing don't have too much compliance

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And here is before and after wheel position in the well

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After that, I wasn't satisfied with the tranny I had so I had a member on a local forum from western Canada ship me some shifting rods from an early T50 along with the short tail housing and shifter

Here is the early and late rods side by side. The early one that goes with the short tails are longer since the shifter act directly on them. The longtail (AE86 one) has a 4th rod between the shifter and the 3 shifting rods so are a little shorter

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Swapping that will allow me to not have to cut the transtunnel for the shifter which is a good 6" forward on the short tail

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But the funny thing is that even if the shifter is 6" forward, the shift knob arrives at about the same place

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So heres the early rods in the 22 spline tranny case

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With the gears

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And say goodbye to worn out shifter bushing :D

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Yeah, the extension housing will get a cleaning but I just wanted to test fit everything first

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Got everything cleaned and painted, it works flawlessly. No comparison with the long tail that was there to begin with.

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And then, when I had just finished adjusting my valve lash, I needed to do it all again... ;)

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Trouble is that those cams were run too long without oil pressure. I got them close to free but all the journals are fubar. The lobes are perfect though. So I set up my trusty old press drill to turn the journal smooth again

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I then went and work on the oil system. I started by welding a baffle in the center of the lower pan. I also put a hinge to stop oil from moving too fast in the front section during hard braking but to allow it to return faster to the rear part when getting back on the throttle. On the right side is a modified 1$ fitting from the plumbing store that is 3/8 NPT inside, it will serve to bolt my oil temperature gauge. On the other side is the same 3/8 NPT plumbing fitting that I modified to bolt on a modified oil strainer that will live in the rear section
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And here is the modified strainer that bolts to the modified plumbing fitting which has a flared fitting bolted to it
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But the best part is this, a real windage tray ;)
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Alright, I know it's pretty ugly inside there, welding oil contaminated steel that's been soaking in for the last 20 years or so makes welding a pita... but who cares when it'll look like that soon. Yep, that's just a leak test with some crappy oil I had in the shed.

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And here's the test fit :

It's a little cleaner outside, here is the fitting for the temperature gauge on the intake side

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And here on the exhaust side, you can see the fitting out of the strainer just above the pan drain plug and on top. A little farther back is the banjo bolt for the cooler return line, shouldn't be too clogged up.

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I also painted the lowerpan but was too lazy to zinc plate the windage tray first so it's just holding there by 2 bolt for the picture

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Zinc plating is fun!

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But after that, the oil pump drive has giving me all sorts of headaches....

So after playing with all those 7A timing crap I noticed that the crank gear is very close in dia to the alternator pulley...

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... and that the cam gear is exactly the same dia as the water pump pulley

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So I hit the junkyard with that in mind.... coming back with 12$ worth of other crap

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And started to mock things up... by using a second crank gear instead of the normal crank pulley and hacking the stock alternator pulley to weld an other crank gear on top, I'll drive the alternator at engine speed, a lot slower than the stock setup does. Same with using a cam gear to drive the water pump... it'll turn at half the engine speed instead of 1:1 like the stock setup.

And here's what it looks like with a 7M timing belt

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Finaly got my oil pump and it fits even better than expected, first oil routing is a go so pickup at the pan to the back of the pump then out the big hole on the side up over it into the fitting by the side of the stock pump housing. Oil cooler will be setup as stock.

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And because slipping belt are so lame...

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If you look hard enough, you might notice that the cam gears are bigger than normal. I've decided to use 7A cam gears instead of 4A and the usual porsche timing belt. To do so you need a 143 tooth 8mm pitch Toyota belt. 2JZ use that so here's what it lloks like.

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I'll really have to check the timing with a dial gauge on the cams but it looks pretty close if not perfect. Bender is square centered on its adjustment, fits like a glove... except :

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Time for minor surgery since the 2JZ is 25mm wide

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Oh yeah that will look awesome once all done!

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After that, I took the pump apart...

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No way I'm going to brake that thing... even less being driven at 57% crank speed.

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And down there is the oil pressure release, just a simple piston that bypass oil from the pressure side to the inlet... way more efficient than moving oil back to the block and spraying the crank with unused oil that will foam in the pan before being picked up again by the strainer and returned back to the pump again... also less chance to suck the pan dry at high rev. So I did this

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Second plug to block off the stock pressure release.




So I finally started working on the water rooting since the heater lines for the core are on the wrong side on the KE20. So I started to make a long alloy tube wrap around the back of the head and make a custom line to hook up the back of the head and then I did that...

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Screw that. It's a summer car, don't need the weight of a heater core to start with. Plus the engine is noticeably heavier than the tiny 3K so setting it as far back as it'll go is the way to go in order not to upset the car's balance. I'll just cut the stock mount from the KE crossmember and move the engine as far back as it'll go. Removing all the crap from behind the engine will just let me move it back a little more. I already have to cut my driveshaft and cutting it 3/4" or 4" is the same amount of work. Also, by looking at that picture :

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Notice how the KE20 stock mounts are miles ahead of the center crossmember section compared to the AE86. The clearance for the oil pan is huge. Also I got my tape measure and figured that the distance between the back of the 3K and the center of the engine mount is the same as on the 4A so if I cut the stock mount from the crossmember and reweld them a couple inch back (and a little more spaced since the 4A is a little wider), the back of the engine should be a lot closer to the firewall and I shouldn't have any clearance issue with the oil pan because of that huge cutaway in the KE20 crossmember.

And then I decided that flexible hose for the oil system is not the most reliable way to go... so I did this

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5S-FE cooler that I got off of an ST204 from the local junkyard...

But hey, no way I'm clogging the back of the head to tap in for water... and no way I'm pushing hot water to cool my oil... so I did this :

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It's a 1/2" aluminum tube that will make a 90° on the side of the block to plug into the oil cooler with a short rubber hose. The return will run above the waterpump in front of the block under the timing belt to reach the backside of the waterpump housing on the other side of the block where the heater hose normally plugs into. It'll all be solid alloy tube except for a small rubber hose where it plugs to the cooler. That way, I'm moving back to having only 2 external solid tube to carry oil from the pan to the pump and from the pump to the block. No flexible lines at all ont the oil system... I'd rather have 2 more coolant line instead, if they burst open you have time to react before any engine damage... when an oil line burst, the block is usually already fubar before you get a chance to notice.

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Water exiting the waterpump will be channelled to the cooler before it has chance to absorb any heat from the engine so the water going to the engine should be at a steedy temperature not far away from the thermostat rating.

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It gets to the cooler by travelling through the lower tube that will be connected to the lower fitting on the oil cooler with a very short heater hose

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Water will then heat up by absorbing heat form the oil and get out of the cooler through the upper hose (heat rises ;) ) and will get to the upper alloy tube by a second short heater hose. It will then travel on the front of the engine, underneat the timing belt...

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...before it reach the rear of the water pump housing (normally used for heater return duty) to be recirculated back in the system

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Not long after that, one of my friend dropped by for a beer (maybe two... or was it three?). We spoke a lot about engines while I showed him the longrod 4A but then he left and the engines was now looking like that...

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It's a no-name header, looks a little like an OBX, probably from chinese origin (most likely), not to sure if they really made it equal length (probably not). Depending on the fitment on the chassis, I may run it as is with a couple extra support welded in for it not to crack (or delay), but if it doesn't it won't bother me to hack it up and make something nice out of it.

Oh and here's and artsy pic that I'm using as avatar.

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You see, I've had a lot of time to think about the setup, and the more I think about it, the more I want to make it better... so as things get done, I reevaluate every other aspect of the build and I'm not so sure about the way the holley sits right now. So I started playing with it and finally turned it 90°

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You see, every 4cyl carb engine I know of have the primary farther away from the valves than the secondary, which makes sense since they are used for crusing and low load situation/part throttle.

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Anyway, since the carb is now "widder" but doesn't need clearance for the linkage next to the head, I removed the intake spacer I made. It's almost as compact as before.

Other thoughts I had also had me a little worried about the tilt of the engine. Since all the oil drain are on the exhaust side, the engine is normally leaning 4° on the exhaust side.

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Which the builder of the intake surely didn't take into account...

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So I'll have to shave the flange at a 4° angle to have the carb sitting level, and I may go a couple extra degres and match the custom motor mount to lean the engines a little farther... will probably help in draining the oil from the head (major issue in 4A) and also help to get the downpipe to clear the steering box.

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Now should also be a lot easier to set the float levels. Also notice how lousy the EGR was blocked off... so I have a couple things to fix there. I am still not sure if I want to cut the whole flange, shave it down for the tilt angle and reweld it 90° around or if I'll just shave it and make a phenolic adpater spacer for it.

Like I said earlier, leaning the engine a little more on the exhaust side should help drain the head faster. Also since the PCV fitting is on the intake side, lifting that valve cover and putting the PCV more upward should aslo help in curing that damn issue when oil get sucked through the PCV during hard left cornering. Only trouble is that I don't want to tilt the oil pan too much and end up with a strainer that is not leveled anymore.

So I spent an hour yesterday tilting the engine on the stand and looking at it, measuring the tilt and looking at it a little more and decided that 10° looks silly enough and should mess the oil pickup level too much...

Go home engine you're drunk!

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No turning back now!

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Getting the parts preheated real good ;)

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Done!

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Although I completely missed the mark...

...by half a degree ;)

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:37 am 
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Amazing engineering going on here :mrgreen: . Cool stuff!


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 6:00 am 
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Whoaar... now THAT is a proper update!! :shock: :lol:
And on top of that, with all the old pics being fixed again, I just had to go back and re-read the whole thread too.

Sorry about what's going on in your private life, but just keep paddling and eventually you'll come out on top again! :wink:

As for your Peanut, this is just such a great build!
Your craftmanship is very admirable. Geeez... that engine looks downright EVIL!! :P
Hope you manage to get it on the road soon...

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Best Regards,
Anders.

JDM '77 Toyota Trueno 1600GT Sprinter (TE61)
+ a handful of classic BMW's from the 60's and 70's.


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 6:11 pm 
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Such cool and inspiring stuff in this thread. keep it up.

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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 10:42 pm 

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:45 am
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Location: Mauka
How did you cut the belt so straight?

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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 11:40 pm 
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Adjustable straight edge, you let the lenght that you want the belt width to be hang out and you use a very sharp utility knife on the edge. Just run it smoothly at first to just cut the surface as straight as possible, then work inside that cut to go all the way through. It helps to have a cut section of belt upsidedown underneat so it mesh with the teeth and the belt stays level, but overall, it didn't take more than 5 minute to do... did the same for the 7M-GTE belt ;)

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 7:56 am 
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Oh and forgot to say thanks for all the kind comments guys. Really appreciate it!

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 11:38 pm 

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:45 am
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Location: Mauka
Thanks for the tip and this is one hell of a build!


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:28 pm 
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Well, got to work on the stupid engine again...

More custom because.... because that's me :)

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You see, I'll never need a cold start injector ever again and the threads are exactly the same as the threads on my thermo-switch for the electric fan sooo...

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But as all of us know, failure is always an option...

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I wanted it to be pointing toward the back... I don't know what happen between the assembly room and the workshop (which is like 5 strides away) but I freaking missed it by 90°... it's barely clearing the alternator at it's minimum position (shouldn't worry about that) but it's too freaking close to the bolt holding the bracket. So I have two options, locate a new water neck and start all over again (I should have a couple hidding but don't seem to find any I'm all of my mess) or use a countersunk bolt instead of the big 14mm hex head... I think I'll go with option B ;)

Oh and I also changed the design of the water tubes feeding the oil cooler. People where worried about it fatiguing due to vibrations. I cut the loop coming out of the waterpump housing and should have a 1/2" u-bent rubber hose tomorow morning to take it's place and I fabricated a bracket to hold the portion under the timing belt. Both tubes are now very firmly attached and no movement is posible where I could wiggle the top one like crazy before.

Image

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1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:19 pm 
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Here's how it looks with the hose

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I also modded the bypass tube since the bloc is taller and the tube is already at an angle...

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For the e-fan thermo-switch, it's still very well tight in there

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But by removing the bolt to simulate clearance with a countersunk bolt, I got that little bit more clearance to make it acceptable

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And there is just enough to snake the wire and connector to it so it'll stay like that.

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Oh and here's the accessory belt setup number "I_didn't_Keep_Track_But_It's_Probably_Too_High_Anyway"

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1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:49 pm 
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Well, I really tried to finish that thing following the plan... really did... couldn't help myself ;)

Alrght, here's the deal : I did the maths on the suzuki oil pump volume, had to do it three times because I couldn't believe how wrong I was at first. It's pretty hard to be really accurate on displacement but my numbers should be pretty good... and I used the same method to estimate all my pumps flow so bias should be about the same. The suzuki pump chunk out 8.82cc/rev, just to give you an idea the redtop/20v pump (the high volume one to use with oil squirters and vvt) pushes 3.78cc/rev while the 7A-FE stock pump (narrow rotor) displaces 3.217cc/rev...

That means that even by underdriving the suzuki pump by ~57% (24/42t) it still pushes 33% more than the highest flowing 4A pump... ideal candidate for a scavenge pump. Yep, time to drysump that little bugger :D

So the plan to keep it simple and not throw away a year worth of work and developpement is to mount the suzuki pump as intended with all the idler and the 7M belt but instead of pushing oil in my gutted oil pump housing, sent it toward a 2 gallon aerator and then fit a stock redtop pump in front of the engine to use as the pressure stage. That way I'm only adding one hose, 3 instead of 2, so it's fairly simple and all the pressure side will be inside the engine, all 3 hose will be be running low pressure. Also since the pressure side will work just as stock there is no guessing on that part.

Apart from swapping my gutted oil pump housing for a redtop one, I'll have to fabricate the aerator but that's no big deal, will put the oil temp gauge in there while at it. I'll also have to fabricate a custom sump, probably a 2 piece construction with the flange made out of 1/2 thick alloy sandwiched between a very shallow, almost flat (10° engine tilt will allow this), steel plate with one central fitting recessed on the exhaust side to serve as scavenge port. The rest is fairly straight forward.

So I'll be stuck to redline the thing under 9000 to save the darn crank mounted pump but that's no big deal, it take two crazy cams to make power above that anyway. Running the engine under vaccum will probably give me more power than trying to stretch the powerband for a couple more RPM... and we are not talking about wear at those RPM plus the added reliability of a constant efficient oil flow from a dry sump setup. The only thing that is bothering me is running a crank mounted pump with no damper... oh sh!t !

So to start off, I decided to mod the scavenge pump a bit... the way it's mounted inside the suzuki sump, the outlet is on the mounting face so it's sealed with a o-ring by tightening the bolt down...

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The mounting surface in my application is the side of the block and there is no hole design to recieve that pump... even more, I need to have a fitting on the outlet to send oil toward the remote tank so I'd have to make the pump stick very far from the block and a really weird and heavy bracket would be needed... time to mod the pump!

There is a piston that serve as an oil pressure release built inside. Since that pump will be run at constant low pressure, no need for that so I decided to use the plug hole behind the piston as my new outlet

In the picture stock outlet is at the top, on the mounting surface. The big hole design for a flange is the inlet and the other hole down is where the piston and spring goes for the pressure relase valve
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Inside, on the left side is the pressure side with the outlet barely visible pointing down, the right side is inlet side and the piston is in the channel on top. When pressure push on it, it moves toward the right and oil can get through the middle hole back to the intake side. There is also an oil pass to lube the spring on the far right.

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Time to get rid of it all

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And braze the outlet shut

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So now I can mount the thing hugging the side of the block by fabricating a really simple adapter plate to bolt in the place of the A/C compressor and the outlet is now facing down with the flange for the inlet positioned a little better than it was before, win-win-win

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Next step is making that really simple adapter plate to serve as bracket and finish modding the pump to seal both halves and the shaft. Stay tuned!

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:10 pm 
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Location: Montreal, Canada
I'm very very very sorry but could help myself and did this

Image

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1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:37 am 
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Perfect!! :P

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Best Regards,
Anders.

JDM '77 Toyota Trueno 1600GT Sprinter (TE61)
+ a handful of classic BMW's from the 60's and 70's.


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:52 pm 

Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2013 1:50 am
Posts: 26
Location: MALAYSIA
awesome....good job


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 12:07 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 6:48 am
Posts: 111
Location: Montreal, Canada
Well the pump is finally hard mounted... the bracket is a little fancy but it all works perfectly with the engine mount and all...

Image

And I also mounted the idler on the same bracket... now disregard the other idler, it'll move up somewhat to get better wrap around the crank sprocket once I fab that other bracket.

Image

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1977 Toyota Corolla TE31 (traded)
1974 Toyota Corolla KE20 (Project)
2003 Toyota Celica ZZT230 (Daily)


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 Post subject: Re: "Project Turquoise" KE20 build
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:09 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 8:50 pm
Posts: 47
Location: Carrollton Tx
Amazing build so far! I dont hate you for leaving the holley set up. (I did haha). The sidedrafts are just much more cleaner of a set up. I cannot wait to hear videos of this thing.

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Good Golly Miss Molly
Zit Tie Technician
"The question remains, is Jimmy Johns Freaky Faster, faster then Zoom Zoom?"


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