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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:07 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
Thanks for the offer, I'm right for accelerator cables. My carb is sorted 8)

Not much going on with the cars, haven't been around due to work commitments and because of that I'm generally tied up with other things in life when I'm not working. It's frustrating because there isn't too much more to do to finish the car off. Most of the remaining work is sourcing hoses, a fuel pump and working through teething problems.... all small things.

I thought I'd get the brakes working... I got fed up with the one man "useless" bleed kits. They are a waste of time, you'd have better luck with a a length of timber to hold to pedal down, a clear hose and a spanner. The timber is used to wedge the pedal down when the bleed nipples need to be tightened. Very tedious so did the following, a lot faster and more effective.

I had an old master cylinder cap lying about, pic 2, sealed the factory pin hole with a soldering iron.
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Next I drilled a hole in the cap and tapped my tyre air compressor attachment to the cap. There is an O ring to complete the seal. All that's required to bleed the brake lines is to open the brake nipple, attach a clear hose so you can see any bubbles and feed about 10 to 20psi into the reservoir, no more than that you don't want to blow the cap off the tank and spray fluid everywhere. It works amazingly well. The tank is split between the front and rear brake circuits. What you see in the photo is the rear brake reservoir fluid being depleted. I will never bleed brakes any other way ever again 8)
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The reservoir has a rubber ring to complete the seal. No ring no seal ! The front 4 spot girling calipers where causing me some grief. I originally swapped the left and right calipers around due to the flex hydraulic hose fowling the struts. Seemed like a bright idea at the time until I needed to expel all the air from the system. Now air rises, the oil sinks to the bottom of the caliper. Problem is the Volvo's have 3 nipples. The essential top most nipple was now at the very bottom of the caliper because of my swap over. In other words the calipers were impossible to bleed. So to fix the problem the calipers where swapped back to there correct sides and I replaced the flex line from the strut to the caliper with a steel hard line. Note that one side of the hard line requires a ball flare (caliper side) the strut side requires a double flare.
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To remind me that both sides where flared differently the brake place used 2 different flare nuts. You guessed it the larger one was the only spanner size I didn't have.... off to the tool store. Pic 2 hard line on, you can just make out the top most nipple. Black zinc plating the calipers is the way to go for that factory look. Spilled fluid will never affect their appearance.
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Pic 1, air bubbles... Pic 2 no air bubbles... front brakes now work 8)
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More work is required to sort out the brakes as the pedal sinks to the floor more than I'd like. For people contemplating a similar conversion some things to bare in mind.

73 Rx3 uses 7/8 " bore (less pedal travel, more foot pressure to brake)
74 Rx3 uses 13/16 " bore (smaller which would give more pedal travel but easier to brake)
Volvo 240 7/8" bore... technically speaking the pedal should feel similar in either Rx3 but it's not. We had a 240 and the brakes were very strong with noticeable pedal travel but I don't recall it being like on the Rx3.
There are 3 types of Volvo Girling 4 spots... non vented rotor version (commonly used on Escorts), vented 36mm piston variant and 38mm variant. I have a pair of each (36mm and 38mm).

I have no idea whether I have a 73 or 74 Rx3 master cylinder in the car, the calipers in the car are 38mm version. To reduce the pedal travel fitting 36mm calipers with the 7/8 MC bore from a 73 would help I think.

My booster has been professionally rebuilt so to rule that out I clamped all 3 remaining flex lines, the front from the strut hose clip to the caliper on each side and the rear diff brake flex line. After doing that the pedal was rock hard which ruled out the booster as the issue. I released the clamp from the diff flex line, there was hardly any difference. I then released the front caliper flex lines and I there was a noticeable unacceptable difference to me.

So I've isolated the problem to be with the calipers themselves. The MC bore is the same as the Volvo original, so either there is still air in the lines or the flex lines are flexing. I'll play a bit more next time I'm back before trying ADR braided lines on the front. Yes The calipers to need to move more fluid but with a MC the same (or very close depending on which I have) the feel should be similar to the Volvo. I've got a couple of other ideas before I fit the originals which I'm not keen on. Pedal ratios between a Volvo and Rx3 which may be a contributing factor as well.

Back to some other minor work...

Rxfury used to get annoyed at my dizzy caps so he sent me some new ones, if the 10a bugs you you can send me the motor out of your coupe :lol: I hope you can now relax a bit more reading my thread 8) Clips have been zinced and thermal paste was used on the ignitor boxes. Pic 2, got a new water temp sensor from Mazda and made a water pump gasket out of gasket paper. I didn't know other rotarys used the same gaskets.... uhh well it's done now. The oil ring is to seal the sensor.
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Water pump in... dizzys in just need to have the timing dialed. Interestingly Racing Beat recommend up to 35 deg BTDC from memory for BP and PP twin dizzy motors. I'll probably be running between 22 to 25 degrees for leading and trailing I think. I recall someone else telling me that TD's have their plugs in a different spot to SD motors. A new early model Rx7 oil cooler has been fitted as well. It just pokes a little below the valiance panel in the corners (not really noticeable) but creates other problems that I need to sort out with the lower section of the fan shroud and under tray. I'm happy to compromise on some things. I don't really want an old oil cooler for reliability reasons. A 12a SD shroud may be the answer as well. Last photo until December, I've gone for a proven exhaust design. I've gone for Racing Beat thick wall headers into twin 1 3/4" ID primaries into a pair of resonators, then into a 2 1/4 " ID collector, 2 1/4 " pre diff muffler an finally into a straight through 2 1/4" Magnaflow rear muffler.
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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 2:55 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
Still collecting small bits for my coupe, in other words haven't touched it.

For now here's some more of the crazy sedan project. I lost a heap of photos unfortunately, I suspect the car was an amphibious prototype that Mazda was experimenting with in the 70's. The sills were filled with expandable foam and fibreglass, aluminum pop rivet repairs to help prevent corrosion used through the car. I believe it was a Rx3 model revision to rivet the seat mounts to the sills.

Over all, I was a little surprised. Parts that I thought were screwed were actually OK while other areas where garbage such as the spare tyre tub. The rails are nice and straight, left quarter is good, right quarter undecided, sills I lopped off as the car will no longer be used to cross the harbour (filled with foam). Boot floor is the rare Mazda fibreglass variety, very rare ! Beaver I thought was garbage, I can work with.....

AHHH yes I hear you say, you beated the roof super straight then lopped it off. Well I got bored one day and thought it was a good idea. As they say where there is smoke there is fire. Pin holes were found in the C pillar of the roof so it had to go. It was the right move.

The skirt I thought about swapping is actually more than repairable..... If you are fixing a Rx3/808 check the seat mounts, they have a habit of cracking. With what I learnt from the coupe, I'm going the extra mile with this one so got it blasted this time. Plans are for either a 10a concourse resto or a restored body with a 12a TD PP. The car looks very similar to John Wright's (motoring authors) old Rx3 race sedan. I'll have to write to Unique Cars and ask him. The car has a fair bit of 80's style suspension mods, all subtitle things.

Thanks to George for doing the hassle free towing and Vinny from M&K Blasting in Greenace for a job well done and being upfront with everything..... onto the photos....


Well it turned out the booth wasn't a paint booth as I first thought.... #-o
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A few more....
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I'm going to start with the more involved repairs, If I can't find a good boot floor I'll have a go shaping my own. The car should be done before the end of the year.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 6:10 am 

Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:31 pm
Posts: 88
Location: sydney NSW
Ha ha.
The foam would be to strengthen the chassis. It is a race thing for some people, you can make a square or rectangle stronger by adding a diagonal brace or just fill it in. Perkins I think was big on this back in the day, I vaguely recall.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 3:16 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
Not a great deal going on as I haven't been around.

I have headaches at work at present and more headaches with my other pretend job (manufacturing Mazda bits) which I'm retiring from. The latest bits have stressed me out somewhat because people don't listen. Regardless of that the ship arrived over the weekend, the parts will be unloaded from the container today and hopefully clear customs. They'll then be freighted to a Sydney warehouse where I'll unload them. My agent sent the parts to the wrong Australian port after repeated requests that they get unloaded in Botany (before they left the origin port) :roll: He's tried to blame me but I sent him the paper work and emails that he'd agreed too ! Hopefully by the end of the week the mess will be over.

I know the Japan Day is coming up and it's 50/50 whether the car will be there. I'll have about a week and bit to sort the rest of it out. Knowing my experience with rotarys I'm not expecting a smooth run. It'll be a miracle if a new 10a TD BP starts off the key to make the event. While I'm away I'll have my other half chase up a few things for us, basically diff and gearbox oil as well as some Evans coolant. Given the car won't be used regularly I'm looking into buying a deep cycle battery.

I had Pirtek make some new oil cooler hoses. They reuse the original fittings and clamp on new hoses.
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Here's the new Rx7 oil cooler fitted that Mazda recently made. The mounts were modified to fit the 10a radiator. There are some caveats for 10a owners though. The main one being that the undertray needs to be modified as it won't fit due to the cooler being larger. In pic 2 you can see the cooler just fits within the lower valance panel although the foam strip sticks out slightly at the ends. Overall though when looking at the car, it's unnoticeable. I have a damaged undertray that I'll modify to suit this car.
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I ordered some new guides and anti rattle springs for the calipers. The original springs and guides had seen better days.
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Setting up the timing. I was making a basic tool to fit over the front pulley to make timing adjustment a little easier. Dazz mentioned to check that TD timing pulley isn't 360mm in diameter which makes making the marks easy. Basically each mm = a degree in timing. Pic 1 shows the factory 10a settings. Pic 2, measuring for the new timing marks.
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Setting the trailing ignition. Dave Broadhurst slots the internal timing plate to allow for the extra timing that may be required for BPs and PPs. It's a really trick setup and well thought out modification. Interestingly Racing Beat recommend up to 35 degrees for TD engines. TDs must have completely different port timing to their SD counterparts I'm assuming.
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Doing the same for the leading ignition....
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Exhaust done.... Long primaries which are 1 3/4 ID into a 2 1/4 collector into a 2 1/4 rear stainless muffler. A lot of people try and reinvent the wheel. Mazda knew this was the best setup from the late 1960s. If you have an opportunity take a look under any stock L10B Cosmo and guess what you'll see. I don't recall exactly but I think the primaries on the L10B may join after the diff. The other key thing is not to go overboard with the ID on the primaries unless you want a lot of noise.
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Nothing fancy at the rear, I sprayed the rear of the muffler black to anti bling it. Also nothing fancy at the tip, just your typical 80's style setup, straight and matt black. Pic 2 completing the engine bay wiring......
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Engine bay pretty much done, just needs the battery clamp repaired, the heater pipe attached to the radiator, OMP sorted and a sump bolt. I'll be ordering new nylon hose for the OMP this week. Jeff sent me some wire style hose clamps to seal the rest of the cooling system. There's a 6 week wait to get new ones from Japan, can't wait as I've had enough !
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That's pretty much it, I still need to install the Carter 4070 fuel pump tighten up the gearbox mounts under the car, install the seat belts, add some fluids and I'm done with this one I think 8-[

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Another update this time on the sedan. I was hoping to take the car (coupe) down to the Japan Day but now that seems unlikely although the car will still be out and about before the end of the year. There's a few small things I need to buy. The car basically needs a weekend of work. I'm still hoping to pop down on the day however I just realised I'm rostered on to work that weekend :-( We'll see what happens. It may sound strange after all the work I've put into the coupe but I don't feel any urge to drive it. There must be something wrong with me but it's the truth. I get my enjoyment from building them, my preference is to drive a car with all the mod cons. That's not to say that it won't be spotted out and about :-)

I thought I'd start with something easy with the sedan. I've started at the rear end and will work my way forward...

The car has been blasted in and out except for the bits that were going to be thrown away. The boot floor is more fibreglass than metal and is a real mess. While trying to remove the brazing with a torch the boot went up in flames :lol: It would of been good if the car burnt to the ground to save me the effort. The heat lifted the fibreglass, not much metal remained.
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Pic 1, the strips of glass that lifted after heating the brazed beaver panel. Pic 2, the beaver panel will be converted to 72 spec. I'll convert the exhaust cutout to look right and I'll make a number plate bracket. To remove I ended up cutting through the remaining joins.
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Pic 1, bear bum.... Pic 2, the beaver has some rivet rust repairs which will be fixed properly.
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Removing the boot floor....
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...and cutting out some more, I think I can save the tyre well easy enough. Parts are too hard to find these days. Most 40yo cars have seen better days.
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Lots of boot rust, Pic 2 more glass was removed so I could see the spot welds on the rear cross member.
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The bits are being saved so I can make a replacement floor. There are some heat shield brackets on the underside that need to be transfered onto the new floor.
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Pretty much all gone now. There is a method to my madness. The new floor will be fabricated out of 3 pieces I think, left, rear centre and right. I still have to clean up some of the old floor. On the left side there will be new metal from the beaver to the wheel arch. I have carefully cut up to the last swage pressing so the repair looks clean and undetectable (hopefully). The same will be done on the right side but will be a little more complex but not much more. I will stamp my own pressings to replicate the original stampings. I'll most likely make the template using my coupes floor. The rear frame is pretty clean, but will be blasted and primed before the new floor goes in.

I'm not going to bother trying to find a genuine replacement floor as it'll be too difficult to one, find one, and two, unpick it without making a mess.
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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 1:18 am 
JNC Enthusiast

Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Is there a big difference between the beaver panel that was on there ('73?) and the 72 year?

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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 6:11 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
72 and 73 are the same. Late 73 has a bigger exhaust cutout for the REAPS exhaust. Aside from that the early cars have an number plate bracket. That's it !

Another small update....

A 1 hour job turned into a weekend job. I had to modify the OMP to operate off the Weber, I was pretty determined to make it work. After looking at other peoples setups I realised that my Weber is mounted 180 deg opposite way. Part of the difficulty in getting the setup to work consistently, reliably and to not jam is that the OMP and the carb throttle operate on 2 different axis. In order to make it work I had to rebend the OMP lever to reduce the offset between the 2 rotating axis. After a lot of stuffing around it works perfect. I highly recommend doing this with the block on an engine stand with all components mounted prior to installing the engine. It will save you a lot of time !
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The modified OMP arm and the new rod that was made out of a door rod. The door rod was a headache to drill through on the carb side for a split pin. After going through 4 brand new drill bits I conceded and took a different approach. I welded on a bit of extra rod on the carb end and used collars as you'll see in the photos further down.
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The result is a perfect operating OMP setup with the Weber :-) While premix works fine for a car that is used daily and for race cars its bodge setup for a streetcar. People think that the oil doesn't seperate from the fuel, I can assure you it does. For you Karters out there, how many of you use last meets premix ? I'm guessing none ! For you people who have never raced 2 strokes the reason is quite simple, the oil separates from the fuel. If you use last meets pre mix you run a high risk of fusing your crank bearings to your crank... btw its a very expensive fix.

The reason why you don't see this problem on rotarys is only because the premix isn't lubing the bearing. You won't see any problem for tens of thousands of KMs realistically and you'll only know once the block is pulled down. Plus I don't see why you'd want premix on a road car.
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Some new radiator over flow bottle hose clips....
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I got some hose clamps off Geoff plus found a few here and there. Mazda still sell some sizes new. Can never have too many of these. Some used ones have come back from the electroplaters.
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New strip fuses purchased from eziautoparts (online), cheap ! Perfect fit and available in different amperages.
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Really exciting stuff here folks....
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One way valve installed for the brake vacuum using Mazda 121 (Rx5 shape) parts...
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A lot of people recommend NGK B9EGV plugs for the street, to be frank with you lot they are shit house on the street. They are great if you like wasting money on spark plugs. The only time I'll use them is for a track day. I've always found BR8ETs to be really good. I've seen others recommend BR8EQs, I can't recall if I used these before but they are probably just as good if not better. The only difference is the extra prong as far as I'm aware. This range of plugs (ET's and EQ's) are factory recommended for the Rx7 (SA) transistor ignition cars which my car has been converted to use.
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So what's remaining.... approx 7 months worth of work I think, need to install the fuel pump, OMP lines, fluids and a battery.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 8:02 am
Posts: 49
Location: Salt lake City, Utah
in awe. wow great work!

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1989 Mazda Rx7 GTUs - BridgePort 6 Port mmmmmmm
1974 Mazda Rx2 Sedan - Home, and Cleaning her up!


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:24 pm 
JNC Enthusiast

Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Nice work John.

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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 3:25 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 4:38 am
Posts: 21
Location: Still aboard the Deathstar with my Plasma cutter
Hey John, great things happening there in your shed 8)

Though i did notice you have a clamp on your brake reservoir hoses to the master. What happened to your wire tie system? that look the goods.

Cheers Kurt


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 2:59 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
Thank you everyone, it's almost all done.

The wire tie system is still there between the fluid reservoir and the master cylinder. At some point i will look at replacing the other end but for now I'm trying to finish off the million other small fiddly things that are more significant.

I'm hoping to do some touring in it around parts of Victoria through the summer before heading back to NSW for a while.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:41 pm 

Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:31 pm
Posts: 88
Location: sydney NSW
Always nice work. It is much better if you take you time on the little things.

I'm not to sure about this heading to NSW. I hope you have Simmons wheels for your car. It is a state law for all Rx3's in NSW :shock:


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 2:13 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
That's OK, I'm leaving it where it is for now until I save enough money for Simmons.

I have nothing against Simmons but no this car won't be wearing them. In the past few years I've seen lots of retro cool wheels in 14" that I much prefer. For this car at least the Watanabe's are here to stay. I quite like them, I think the car sits nice on them. If I were to fit Simmons they'd a 15" V4 or B45, nothing larger. The problem I had with the 14" Wat's is tyre sizes are pretty restrictive. In the end I ended up buying a set of Toyo's from England of all places from Demon Tweaks, quite reasonable in price as well. 15" tyres are easier to find in varying sizes which makes them attractive.

I went on shopping spree over the weekend. I'm just missing the coolant now. I was looking at buying an Odyssey brand battery seeing that the car may be sitting around for a few months here and there. Instead I ended up with an Optima Redtop which cost me a little more than $50 over a quality lead acid, it comes with a 3 year warranty as well so was pretty happy with the buy. Now I need to modify the battery retaining bracket to fit across the top of the battery, yes one of those small jobs.

Part of the shopping trip was to buy oils, I've got some Penrite sythentic for the gearbox and diff. The oil has some friction modifier for the LSD, however after doing a little reading I'm lead to believe the friction modifier is only required for LSD clutch disks with organic contact pads. I'm pretty sure Mazda LSD disks are all metal so not required. Anyway I really don't know ! For the engine I bought good old Valvoline XLD, you know what I mean :lol: It's never given me problems in the past, it's perfect for ancient technology engines like my 10a. It'll help reduce all those twin dizzy rotary seal clearances.

I also fitted up the brand new drivers door glass, managed to scratch the black door frame this time. Another small job to the list, but for now I just touched it up. The engine bay is now complete (aside from the battery bracket) so thought I'd add the oil, check for leaks and give it a crank. All went well, no leaks from the engine, it turns over which is a bonus with the starter motor I rebuilt. Very surprised nothing blew up ! I've got a hunch it's going to be on the loud side, I'll soon see. The Carter fuel pump is the next thing to go in, then some fuel and fingers crossed it'll start.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 5:10 am 

Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 7:03 am
Posts: 32
Location: Adalaide, Australia
John now that you have heard it cranking over and know oil pressure is good it will be motivation to get the thing running soon . Good luck mate hope it is before the new year s for ya and can get some km before the end of the Christmas break


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2013 6:08 pm 

Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:15 am
Posts: 289
Location: Adelaide
Exciting times! A good read as always John!

Look forward to a couple pics of the car parked out in the sun all shiny.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:23 pm 
JNC Enthusiast

Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Melbourne, Australia
John - I'm not you can use them with an Optima battery (and you may not need it), but for the wagon I have one of these:

Ctek: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/CTEK-MXS10-B ... 0825365996

^ same seller has them delivered for $80. I have one for the wagon, the Rover and one for the bike. Works great, brings nearly dead batteries back from the dead as well. Great for cars that sit around with minimal use.

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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 3:21 am 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
Yes I've seen those, I borrowed a CTEK charger from a friend. I'll buy one for myself eventually.

Well, having a string of teething problems with the Mazda. Fixed some leaks and some other issues, more to go.
I was suppose to start it but would you believe I don't have a spark plug tool of all things !

The dash idiot light goes off which is good but the oil pressure light hasn't switched off yet. I've given it about 3 or 4 cranks. Anyone have idea how long before it gets oil pressure ? All the lines and cooler are new as is the block, I'm guessing it might take a while to get all the air out.

If the light doesn't go out I'll connect a mechanical gauge directly to the block.


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 4:35 am 

Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:31 pm
Posts: 88
Location: sydney NSW
Best way I have found with fresh motors is, No spark plugs(spins better/quicker), oil flitter off and crank it. You will see the oil come up the centre hole. It is sometimes good to have a gauge just for first start up or run in stage


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:11 pm 
JNC Enthusiast

Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:26 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Prime the oil pump?

(not sure if you can do it on a rotary, but on a V8 you take dissy out, spin with a tool attached to a drill etc). I'm sure you know what I mean.

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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:25 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:09 pm
Posts: 569
Location: Australia
No oil pump is driven off eccentric shaft, there is no way to disconnect it without pulling down the front of the engine.

Won't cranking the motor without the filter cause a big mess ? Never thought of that though, I'll crank it over a few more times before I go looking for an oil gauge to connect to the block. It might be a faulty sensor (have a spare), faulty wiring (highly unlikely because I wired the car :-) ), or a problem with the motor, lets not go there because the car will go into long term storage if there's a problem there !

I think it most likely needs more cranking to build some pressure... not panicking yet :-)


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 Post subject: Re: 1973 Mazda Rx3
PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:47 pm 

Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:47 am
Posts: 65
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
first up disconnect the return oil cooler line to make sure you have oil moving through the whole system and make sure the battery is at full capacity, rotary's need to spin as fast as the starter will allow


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