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Thread: JNC Terminology

  1. #1
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    JNC Terminology

    So today I called JDM Legends looking for new wheels for the fb, when through conversation I discovered that I had been pronouncing Hakosuka incorrectly. Previously, I was saying something along the lines of "hey ko sue ka" which was way off.. So now I'm wondering what other JNC terms I have been completely butchering.. How is hachiroku pronounced? Bosozuku? Also, there are a lot of Japanese terms used on the JNC blog, and I don't know what they mean; wangan for example. Can we make a little cheat sheet to educate my western mind?

  2. #2
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    Haha

    I took Japanese through high school and university, though I haven't kept it up as well as I'd like, if only my occupation gave sufficient opportunity...

    A is "awe"
    I is "ea"t
    U is "ooh"
    E is "eh"
    O is "oh"

    "U" vowel sound (and occasionally to a lesser degree "I") is generally glossed over quickly or omitted, especially at the end of a word (hakosuka= hakos'ka, hachiroku= hach'rok, desu, itadakimasu= etc.)

    I always found the pronunciations fairly in line with how every other language enunciates vowels, so having been a bit surrounded by it, it was always amusing to hear my friend say things like "key car" (kei car) or "Kai-ooh-sha" (kyuusha) :lol: Japanese is very regular in pronounciation, especially once it's transliterated into our alphabet.

    I'll leave particular terminology to others, but Wangan is a specific place name.

  3. #3
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    I thought that Wangan translated as highway or motor-way or something similar but I only saw one episode of Japanese Sesame Street and it was brought to me by the letters "A" and "E" and the numbers "8" and "6" so I really don´t know diddly squat about pronunciation or even some of the terminology used by the Japanese.
    I do not necessarily feel that it is essential to know the Japanese nicknames for cars, sub-cultures etc. but I do find it interesting and I think I would prefer to be informed, use the term in the correct context and pronounce it correctly.
    So, if anyone can contribute here and help edumacate oldisgold, myself and other members that would be great.
    Everyday is a school day.

  4. #4
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    Me too please !
    Google & Bing translator dont help much, took me ages to work out what a "ska coffer" was....

  5. #5
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    OK, I am going to start the ball rolling here with some probably quite obvious words, names and terminology used that I think I know.
    Not sure on pronunciation and my descriptions may need refined. As people add more information I will edit and update this post.
    So here goes (in no particular order) -

    Hachi - the number 8
    Roku - the number 6
    Hachi-Roku - 8 6 (eight six) the Japanese name for an AE86 Corolla/Trueno/Levin

    Tura - face
    Ichi - the number 1
    Turaichi - An architecture and design term literally meaning "one face" ie where two surfaces converge and become level on a single plane

    Shakotan - car with lowered body (literally "short height car")

    Oni-kyan - demon camber

    Hippari tire - pulled or stretched tyres

    Haiso car - older, low-rider style cars

    Kaidou - Highway racer

    Jinba ittai - often used in reference to the design approach taken by Mazda in conceptualizing the MX5 it means rider (jin) horse (ba) as one (ittai).

    T?ge or Touge - "pass" as in a mountain pass or narrow winding road

    Wangan - "bayshore" Tokyo's infamous Bayshore Route, noted for street racing. (I checked)

    ... and some not so helpful ones -

    Katana - a type of Japanese sword

    Yakuza - someone you should be polite and respectful to at all times

    Sushi - something the "Yakuza" (see ref.) will turn you into with a Katana (see ref.) if you fail to be polite and respectful.

    Geisha - friendly and helpful ladies who make a nice cup of green tea. Often accomplished musicians and trained in the art of traditional Japanese etiquette they are less likely to be addicted to crack-cocaine and steal your wallet than their western counterparts.

    The Zen Method - a way of keeping your calm when frustrated by lying car sellers and ridiculous pricing while searching for your Japanese nostalgic car. The credo which is repeated like a mantra is - "The right car will find me at the right time".
    Originated in Dubai but is finding followers internationally. Requires practice and commitment but does not always guarantee success. When a practitioner loses it they have been known to behave like a Yakuza (see ref.) and use a Katana (see ref.) to make Sushi (see ref.) out of the lying, cheating, over pricing and time wasting vendor.
    When this happens it is recommended that the practitioner seek out a Geisha (see ref.) to help the practitioner of The Zen Method relax.
    Nothing beats a nice cup of green tea.

    Anyway, I have to go back to work and do something productive today or I will be forced to sack myself.
    I will add more (genuine) entries later.

    Thanks.

  6. #6
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    Oldisgold, there does not seem to be any takers to help us out here apart from Dachshund´s informed post (and my retarded post).
    Dmk66 posted a cryptic message about "ska coffer" which I had never heard of before. Did a search with no defining description. Best educated guess is that it is another name for a Hakosuka.

    Hako - box
    Suka - beginning of the word "skyline" as pronounced in Japanese
    Hakosuka - C10 "box skyline"

    So, I believe that "Suka" is pronounced almost like "Ska" in English. Reference Dachsund´s post -
    "U" vowel sound (and occasionally to a lesser degree "I") is generally glossed over quickly or omitted, especially at the end of a word (hakosuka= hakos'ka, hachiroku= hach'rok, desu, itadakimasu= etc.)

    And a "coffer" is a "small chest for holding valuables" so in other words a box.
    Ska coffer - Skyline box.
    Perhaps it is an alternative nickname or a translation from Japanese written language into English - me not know.

    Its a guess so if you are reading this Dmk66 please correct me if I have this wrong.

    I will post another obvious one here which everybody who knows thinks everybody else knows but in reality people who have only recently felt the draw of Japanese nostalgic cars rarely know -

    Kenmeri - C110 Skyline. The name comes from the two characters in the Japanese advertising and commercials for the C110 Skyline. Ken and Mary. Simple one to understand and I believe the pronunciation is similar to English.

    So, come on people. If everybody posted up one description and those that know helped with pronunciation we could all be a little bit better informed.

  7. #7
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    ToolZ, on the nosey !
    I think the point I was trying to make was that as non Japanese speakers, we are all at the mercy of translations that are either 3rd or 4th hand or generated by the the magic ( :? )that is the Internet.
    Watching youtube adds to the frustration, all Japanese car guys look like they're having a hoot but I dont get it !
    The obvious solution is that we all learn to speak & read the lingo, any shortfalls we may have as linguists could by made up with enthusiasm, but though I'm thinking about giving it a go it's a bit daunting.
    When I decided that I needed a C10 in my life I started looking at dealers in Japan, loved what I saw but even with google translate found myself having to translate the translations !
    At least the Japanese use a bit of English in the car world so we have a chance but I reckon a bit of night school is on the cards....

  8. #8
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    Dmk66, thanks for that.
    I was a bit worried about posting what I thought it meant and then being told I was way out.
    I think that is maybe why there have not been more posts here. People have a loose idea of what the terminology means but are worried about appearing foolish if they get it wrong.

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  10. #10
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    Re: JNC Terminology

    A few more.
    Again, pronunciation unknown so feel free to contribute to this thread.

    Kyusha Style - Japanese old classic car tastefully ( ) modified. Example - with small wheel arch extensions/fender flares and lowered a little on nice rims.

    Grachan (Garuchan) Style - Reference to the Grand Championships on Fuji Speedway (1970´s - 1980´s). These cars have similar styling to the cars that used to race (wide fenders etc. Super Silhouette style).

    Boso - violently running
    Zoku - relating to a gang
    B?s?zoku - violent running gang. A Japanese subculture associated with motorcycle clubs and gangs.
    In reference to cars it usually means extravagantly over-styled body-kits, extended exhausts, crazy paint schemes and lowered into the abyss!
    Most Bosozoku cars are not however owned by gang members and should therefore be referred to as "Bosozoku-style" cars to avoid confusion.

    Sha - car
    Zokusha - gang car (alternative to Bosozoku)

    I used to write these down as I encountered them back in the day. Unfortunately I do not have the book I wrote them in here in Dubai.
    I am working off memory then doing a quick search to confirm.

    Any correction required would be appreciated.

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